Got a Jones for neo-psychedelic pop?

jessie-jones_wide-610e3b1a6b04867224a817482d4c456b7b944c8a-s900-c85A couple of days back, I was lamenting with my oldest son about the lack of punk or edgy rock on the airwaves. Dead Sara, L7, and Veruca Salt (all three groups are touring now) came up in the conversation. I keep hoping to hear something other than bland post-grunge, multi-layered, harmonic pabulum on the radio (and that includes XMSirius’ so-called Alt Nation). In desperation I’ve been turning to fresher alternatives like Wifee and the Huzz Band (featured here last week).

This week, thanks to the LA Times and NPR, I’ve been introduced to Jessie Jones. In comparison to what I’d like to hear, she’s still a little too pop. But she tries to mine a different shaft with her neo-psychedelic sound. Here’s a bit of what NPR reviewer Jillian Mapes wrote about Jessie http://www.npr.org/2015/07/15/422555829/first-listen-jessie-jones-jessie-jones:

Psychedelic music is in the midst of a minor revolution, or at least one of neo-psychedelia’s most pronounced revivals since the Paisley Underground in the early ’80s or New Weird America throughout the second half of the ’00s. While those two scenes looked to psych’s closest neighbors — underground rock and folk, respectively — for help, psych circa 2015 journeys further to borrow a cup of pop sugar, as led by Tame Impala and others who obscure the line between Boomer rock and electronic music.

Jessie Jones, the former singer of Orange County garage-psych outfit Feeding People, doesn’t quite fit into that latter category. Instead, she takes an ambling path through all eras of psych’s past, from The Doors’ acid-blues (“Lady La De Da”) to the genre’s fascination with mystical odysseys (“Nightingale,” which features King Tuff’s Kyle Thomas) and world music (the southeastern European seduction of “La Loba”). But like many of her more established peers, Jones excels when she mines that moment in the mid-’60s when the world’s biggest bands found drugs and bubblegum followed suit by getting trippy.

Cropped photo courtesy of NPR.

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